How to make turkey salad with celery root and apple

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Chef Amy Topel, the food columnist for National Geographic's The Green Guide, shares her easy turkey salad recipe and shows us how to turn leftover turkey into a simple organic turkey salad, without mayonnaise!

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  • Amy Topel

    Amy Topel Educator and Food Columnist, The Green Guide Amy Topel honed her culinary skills working in restaurants in New York City. She spent a summer in the kitchen at the Herb Farm with Jerry Traunfeld, and has worked as a private chef and caterer. more about this expert »

in the kitchenBasics
How to make turkey salad with celery root and apple

Chef Amy Topel, the food columnist for National Geographic's The GReen Guide, shares an easy recipe and shows us how to make a simple organic chopped turkey salad, without mayonnaise!

Ingredients

½ cup strained low-fat yogurt

1 tablespoon grainy Dijon mustard

1 large celery root, chopped into thin julienne (about 3 cups)

2 tart green apples, pelled and chopped into thin julienne

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1 small fennel bulb, cored and chopped into thin julienne (about ½ cup)

1 small red onion, sliced into thin strips (about 1/3 cup)

½ dried cranberries

½ cup walnuts, toasted

¼ cup fresh parsley leaves

2 cups sliced cooked turkey

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Chef Amy Topel's simple chopped turkey salad recipe serves 10-12.

  1. Combine the strained low-fat yogurt and the grainy Dijon mustard and set aside. (To strain the yogurt, take regular low-fat plain yogurt and set it in a strainer lined with coffee filters. Let it sit for about three hours to get most of the liquid out, thicken up, and concentrate its tanginess. If you choose, you may be able to find strained low-fat yogurt in the store.)
  2. Peel the celery root. Using a chef’s knife, cut off the outside, removing the brown exterior. You've removed enough when the celery root looks nice and smooth and moist. When you get to the bottom -- where the roots grow -- you have to take off significantly more. Keep trimming until all of the brown exterior is removed.
  3. Cut peeled celery root in half, and using a mandolin, chop it into very thin slices. (Mandolins are available at a lot of cooking stores. It’s referred to as a Japanese mandolin and it makes a lot of cutting jobs much easier. Be sure to use the finger guard, as the blade is very sharp.
  4. Cut the slices into a thin julienne using your chef's knife and place in a large mixing bowl.
  5. Add one green apple that also been cut into a thin julienne, and then one tablespoon of lemon juice over the celery root and apple. Mix that together with your hands just to keep the celery root and apple from turning brown. (They will start to oxidize -- turn brown -- if they sit out too long. So complete this step right before you’re going to serve the salad.)
  6. Combine the rest of the ingredients -- thinly sliced fennel, thinly sliced red onion, dried cranberries, toasted walnut pieces and fresh parsley leaves. Note: Leave the parsley leaves whole as they look much prettier that way and really dress up the salad.
  7. Add the yogurt and mustard mixture and quickly stir all together. You may find it easier to mix this with your hands.
  8. Add a little bit of salt to taste and some black pepper when the ingredients are mixed and really well combined.
  9. Add the turkey and just give it a few turns. At this stage you may definitely find it easier to use your hands. (You add the turkey at this stage because if you added it earlier, and then tried to mix all the ingredients together, you might end up breaking the turkey into small pieces, which you don’t want.)
  10. Let it sit for 15 or 20 minutes so that the flavors can meld. (You want to think of this salad the way you think of coleslaw — it really benefits from hanging around in the refrigerator for a while!)
Unlike other turkey salad recipes, this easy recipe is made without additional calories from mayonnaise and made tasty by Chef Amy Topel's use of organic celery root, cranberries and apples. Enjoy!
Transcript

Hi, I’m Amy Topel from The Green Guide for howdini. If you’ve got leftover turkey hanging around, head to the farmers market and grab some celery root and apples, and I’m going to show you how to make a delicious salad.

We’re going to start by making the dressing. We’re going to combine one-half cup of strained low-fat yogurt and one tablespoon of Dijon mustard. Just mix the two together and set it aside. To strain the yogurt, I’ve taken regular low-fat plain yogurt and I’ve set it in a strainer that was lined with coffee filters. I let it sit there for about three hours to get most if the liquid out so that I thicken it up and concentrate its tanginess. If you choose, you may be able to find strained low-fat yogurt in the store. Once these two things are combined, I’m just going to set them aside.

The next step is prepping all my ingredients. I’m starting with celery root. This may be a little odd-looking to you, but they’re all over the markets right now. They’re really fresh, delicious and it’s a great ingredient. I need to start by peeling the celery root. You’ll notice that it has a really rough texture. I can’t peel it with a regular peeler. What I’m going to do is peel it with my knife. I’m going to just start cutting off the outside, removing the brown exterior. You’ll know if you remove enough if you’re looking at the celery root and it looks nice and smooth and moist. When you get to the bottom of it where the roots grow, you have to take off significantly more. You want to keep going until you’ve gotten rid of all of the brown that runs through it. Celery root may also be listed as celeriac in some of your recipes. It’s a really great and way-underutilized ingredient. It has a very fresh, celery sort of flavor to it, but the consistency when cooked is more like white potato.

Now that I have it completely peeled I’m going to cut it in half; and using a mandolin, I’m going to cut it into very thin slices. They have these mandolins at a lot of cooking stores. It’s referred to as a Japanese mandolin and it makes a lot of cutting jobs much easier. You want to really be careful because the blade is intensely sharp and you can easily hurt yourself. After the first few slices you may want to adjust the thickness so that you’ve got exactly what you want. I’m down to a very thin piece here, and I’m worried about cutting my fingers; so I’m going to use this finger guard to make sure that I don’t. I just hold the finger guard on top of the slice and continue slicing back and forth.

Now that I have the celery root sliced, I’m going to use my knife to cut it into a thin julienne. Celery root, like apple, will start to oxidize or turn brown if it sits out too long. So this is the kind of thing that you want to do right before you’re going to serve it. Once the celery root is julienned I’m going to toss it in a large mixing bowl.

Now I’m ready to combine all the rest of my ingredients. I’m including one green apple that I’ve also cut into a thin julienne, and then one tablespoon of lemon juice over the celery root and apple. And I’m just going to mix that together with my hands just to keep them from turning brown. Once I get those things thoroughly combined, I’m going to add in one small fennel that’s been cut into a thin julienne, a very small red onion or even maybe half of a medium onion, half a cup of dried cranberries, half a cup of walnut pieces, a quarter cup of fresh-picked parsley leaves — and you’ll notice I’ve left them whole, I didn’t chop them up: it’s much prettier that way.

I’m then going to add the dressing that I made earlier and quickly stir it all together. The last component I’m going to add is the turkey. If I add it now and then try to mix it in I might end up breaking the turkey into small pieces, which I don’t want to do. You might find it easier to mix this with your hands. It’s sometimes a little bit difficult. You can do whatever you’re comfortable with. Once it’s mixed and really well combined, I’m going to add a little bit of salt to taste and some black pepper. When I feel like it’s well mixed, I’m going to put in the turkey and just give it a few turns. At this stage you may definitely find it easier to use your hands.

Okay, we’ve got the turkey all mixed in and we let it sit for 15 or 20 minutes so that the flavors can meld. You want to think of this salad the way you think of coleslaw — it really benefits from sort of hanging around in the refrigerator for a while. That’s it — we’re ready to serve. I’m just going to take a serving platter and put my salad onto the platter. I’m Amy Topel from The Green Guide for howdini.


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